Tag Archives: D-Day

Europe 2014 – D-Day Beaches

Our D-Day itinerary included a full day of sites, beaches, and memorials. Armed with a map and some snacks, we set out from Bayeux early that morning. Our first stop was Arromanches, about a 10 minute drive to the north.

Arromanches was the launching point for the Allied invasion. Overnight, 17 ships sailed across the English Channel to the coast of Arromanches. Once in place, their crews sank the ships, bow to stern, to form a sea barrier. Adding to the barrier were 500 tugboats and 115 “Mulberries” – floating cement blocks the size of football fields – which were also sunk. All this created a 4-mile long sea wall about 1.5 miles off-shore. Once the sea wall was established, the Allies could bring in floating steel “pierheads”, from which they extended floating roads (made of concrete pontoons) all the way to the shore. The operation was the brainchild of Winston Churchill, and so the harbor was dubbed Port Winston. Over just 6 days, the Allies brought 54,000 vehicles, 326,000 troops, and 110,000 tons of supplies across the English Channel in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. The harbor was designed to be temporary, but various pieces still remain scattered around the beach.

We spent time at the D-day Landing Museum, which did an amazing job explaining how the harbor was constructed and allowing us to appreciate the sacrifice of so many soldiers who left their lives on the beach below. It was chilling to imagine such a site, and footage of the invasion left us pretty emotional.

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